A 21-year-old man who broke into a Dollar General last year pleaded guilty to the crime and will spend two years in jail, announced Attorney General Jim Hood.

Marshall Howard, of Goodman, was sentenced Friday by Holmes County Circuit Court Judge Janie Lewis on one count of business burglary. He was sentenced to five years in the custody of the Mississippi Department of Corrections with two of those years to serve, three years suspended, and three years post-release supervision.

Howard was arrested by the Pickens Police Department in January 2017 for breaking into a Pickens Dollar General with another person by using a shopping cart. The alarm alerted police to the scene, and although Howard and his accomplice were no longer there, police found items missing including cigarettes, wine, and cell phones. A tip led police to Howard that day, at which point he was arrested and charged.

“I hope this young man will learn a lesson while he’s behind bars that no item in a store is worth spending part of your life in a jail cell,” said General Hood. “The successful response to the crime and locating of the suspect was a joint effort by the Pickens Police Department and Holmes County Sheriff’s Office. I offer a job well done to both agencies.”

A conflict of interest at the district attorney’s office sent this case to the attorney general. It was prosecuted by Special Assistant Attorney General Marvin Sanders with the AG’s Public Integrity Division.

  1. jerone Garland says:

    This case is the type my Criminal Justice Reform Program targets.
    Agreed, he was wrong.
    He was sentenced to five years in the custody of the Mississippi Department of Corrections with two of those years to serve, three years suspended, and three years post-release supervision.
    I propose five years in the custody of the Mississippi Department of Corrections on GPS monitoring with curfew restrictions.
    Now lets create jobs building subdivisions of houses for the homeless, expanding infrastructure and providing social services.
    Instead of this young man’s life being scared by abuse and criminalization. He would be returned to his family motivated to be responsible and provided the opportunities to succeed.
    If you agree this the better way
    on June 5th vote to elect Jerone Garland, United States Senator

  2. marilyn says:

    Oh yes. Let’s give him a swat on the hand and say he committed this crime because of the lack of housing and social services. That is a joke! He has as much opportunity as any other person. He is a healthy and able-bodied man who had rather be a thug and take something that is not his. Every action has a consequence. It doesn’t matter who you are, where you are from. When you reach a certain age, you know right from wrong. You choose what you do and should be ready to accept the consequence of that decision. Has his family motivated him up to this point to be responsible for his actions? Has he not been provided opportunities that every other person has been provided? I think so. But let’s let him go home, give him a curfew (REALLY?) and tell him to be a good boy. MDOC is the reform program these thugs need. It has nothing to do with lack of opportunity. Get real. Who believes this attempt to justify the crimes committed by these thugs?

  3. Tim says:

    I don’t think that he is trying to give someone a swat on the hand. I think giving them a chance to fix their lives is what is needed. Now if the option that Jerone is proposing won’t work then I say place the male in jail. I see this everyday. I used to think like you Marilyn but once you talk to some of these kids, you see where the problems are. And yes some are homeless, they don’t have people skills and some do lack socialization. I have seen youth that come from families that are in jail. I know one that father is in the same jail as the son. It’s sometimes passed down in the family. They have to do what they have to do to survive. And they take what they have to in order to help their family. So calling them “thugs” is not going to fix the problem. Let’s find ways to help and give these underprivileged youth a chance to change their lives. Jail is not the best place to give rehabilitation. I work in corrections in Texas. Not every situation is the same.

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